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Morris

Morris

Morris (started by William Morris - Viscount Nuffield) was an extremely successful firm during the late 1930s. Its well-liked products included the affordable Morris Eight (unusually for a small car of the time, featuring hydraulic brakes), plus the mid sized Ten and Twelve, also the much larger but similarly styled Fourteen, Sixteen and Eighteen. The War temporarily finished car building for public…

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Morris J4 ‘59-‘74

Fast Facts

  • Produced:
    1959-1974
  • Engine:
    1622cc
  • 0-60 mph:
    20 secs
  • Top Speed:
    79mph
  • MPG:
    30mpg

In the pre-Transit era of British panel vans the Morris J4 was considered the state of the art LCV. It’s forward control styling gave a load capacity of 160 cuft while the load space represented some 60 per cent of the van’s overall length. And it became a familiar sight in red for the GPO or as a Black Maria a la the cover of Abbey Road. The pick-up variant was offered for the building market; in the 1960s they were always seen on motorway construction sites. The payload was increased to 10cwt in 1961 with the J4-M10 and this was replaced by the 14cwt 180J4 and the 20cwt 200J4 in 1968. Known as an ‘Austin- Morris’ from 1969 onwards, the J4’s forward control styling became increasingly less popular in the 1970s because it offered minimal crash protection and servicing could be time-consuming. So it wasreplaced in 1974 by the more conventional, trusty, Sherpa that carried on well into the 1990s as the Leyland DAF 200/400.

Morris Marina TC

Fast Facts

  • Produced:
    TC 1972-1975 HL/GT/Special 1975-1978
  • Engine:
    1798cc S4 OHV 95bhp @5250 rpm
  • 0-60 mph:
    13 secs
  • Top Speed:
    94 mph
  • MPG:
    26 mpg

Now with a devoted following, the TC (Twin Carburetors) Marinas were fitted with the MGB 1.8 B-series engine and came with either two (coupe) or four (saloon) door bodies. Performance was indeed brisk although handling was very interesting due to a chronic understeer. From the Marina range’s facelift the TC engine was offered in the up market Special, HL (four-door) and GT (two-door) models distinguished by their front spot lamps and their wonderfully kitsch interiors. The engine was dropped with the advent of the ‘advanced’ OHC 1.7 power unit in 1978 and today a well-kept survivor can prove a surprisingly efficient (and lively) workhorse. A four-door family-sized MGB ? Well, worse comparisons have been made…