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Triumph 2000

Triumph 2000 Published: 8th Aug 2016 - 0 Comments - Be the first, contribute now!

Triumph 2000
Triumph 2000
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Designed to replace the staid but solid Vanguard, the Triumph 2000 was the first totally modern Triumph and one which broke away from the old frumpy Standard mould. A quality saloon and estate that you can argue BMW emulated with its 5 Series, they offer an incredible amount of metal for your money and make very good daily drivers and general runabouts.

Driving

Compared to its in-house rival launched at the same time, the Rover P6 2000, the Triumph’s trump card has always been its smooth and (for its day) swift six-cylinder engine that, when allied to overdrive, spelt relaxed and economical motoring that only a Jag could match. The 2.5PI was a true sports saloon that still delights with its verve while the estate was a sports holdhall that was in a class of its own – and more usable than any Scimitar GTE. Handling benefits from the same rear IRS suspension found on the TRs and it’s certainly a more comfortable car than the smaller more cramped Dolomite (and the Rover for that matter) although the characteristic front end ‘lean’ into the corners needs addressing – fit the anti-roll bar from a 2500S to cure it. Unlike the Rover, automatic transmission, overdrive and power steering were all optional.

Best models

The Mk1 is liked by purists for its style and compactness, the Mk2, complete with its Stag looks, is longer, bulkier and doesn’t handle as well as a consequence, although there’s little in it. Most enthusiasts will want a 2500 model, either in PI or easier-to-own carburettor tune with the last-of-the-line 1975 2500S (higher tuned engine, sportier suspension, Stag wheels) the pick of the pack. However, many 2000s have been upgraded with the larger engine by now and are as good.

Values

If you’re after a cheap classic, look no further. Top 2000s can be had for less than £5000 with the 2500/PI only a couple of grand more and average cars are easy £2500 buys, although given how little the best models still sell for, it’s false economy to buy one to ‘do up’.

Buying advice

Rot is endemic, and facelifted Mk2s (May 1974 on) appear to be most rot-prone of all. The front wings are double-skinned around the wheelarches, creating a water trap. The most common problem concerns rotten sills and footwells, while rear suspension pick-up points also dissolve, as do the top spring mountings on the rear suspension, which can also sag. Low valves mean that full restorations are hardly financially logical.

Engines are durable, but can suffer from excess crank end-float. Up to 12-thou means a simple replacement of the thrust washers might effect a cure. Over about 50thou and the thrust washers fall out.

Oil pressure should be quite high. If it drops as low as 10psi at idle or the needle becomes erratic, the crank is probably worn. Gearboxes are long-lived; never lightning fast, but if it’s noisy then a lack of oil may well have ruined the layshaft. Clonks on take-up may be U/Js (cheap), worn driveshafts or cracked diff mountings (expensive). Trim parts are coming particularly scarce.

 



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