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Jaguar S-Type

Jaguar S-Type Published: 6th Feb 2015 - 0 Comments - Be the first, contribute now!

Jaguar S-Type
Jaguar S-Type
Jaguar S-Type
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The S-Type was Jaguar’s attempt to re-introduce itself into the cheaper compact executive market dominated by the Germans with a pastiche patriot that was said to be the New Mk2 – even though it looked like the old S-type and badged as such!

IN BRIEF

Based upon an American Lincoln platform, it was a good if somewhat indifferent saloon that only came right after a major revamp in 2002, three years after original launch. Apart from the sensational S-Type R sports saloon, there’s little classic credentials in the range although they are excellent value and good daily drivers.

DRIVING

The Lincoln platform was substantially retuned to ensure that the S-Type drove like a Jaguar should although it fell short of the BMW 5 Series. Having said that, a good one performs well with rear-wheel drive handling and ample performance from the Mondeo-sourced V6 and XK8-derived V8. While it’s unfair to say chalk and cheese, the 2002 revamp is immensely superior in all departments. The later range also brought forth a wider engine range, such as a rather sweet and swift 2.5 V6 and the 400bhp S-Type R which is a scalded cat par excellence.

BEST MODELS

Without question, the 2002 range is what the S-Type should have been from the outset both dynamically and quality-wise. If performance isn’t a priority, the V6s are more than adequate with their pace and frugality, but if the latter is especially important then the 2.7TD (as also used in the Range Rover Sport) is the one to have, even though its narrow power band has been criticised (a performance chip works wonders on this unit). At launch there was just the Base (cloth trim) and SE trims but this was bolstered by the de-chromed Sport, Spirit and XS. If you prefer to cog-swap yourself (and it’s Jag’s slickest design yet), bear in mind that all V8s, even the R, are automatics only.

VALUES

Ten year old cars can be had for a little over £3000 on the forecourts or £2000 in the classifieds and auctions, while the original cars, first introduced in 1998, are sub £1000 buys. Even the racy R (our pick of the range) sell for under £5000 which is astonishing value as this will certainly be a ‘keeper’ for future classic status, with last- of-the-line models valued at anything between £6600-£9600.

BUYING ADVICE

S-Type lives on in the XF and spares present no problems, either from main agents or the army of traditional independents who are now tackling modern Jags such as the XK8 and S-Type. They can be maintained at home although some jobs are specialist such as reading fault codes etc or tackling electronic problems. Certain parts originate from the Ford parts bin, such as switchgear. It’s best to buy with the backing of a warranty as a disappointing catalogue of ailments plagued some cars – respective internet forums will tell you more. For V8 and TD checkpoints refer to XJ and XK8 comments elsewhere, and beware of hard used but poorly maintained Rs. Original cars were not that well built and switchgear can play up on all models.



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