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Triumph TR6

Triumph TR6 Published: 28th Nov 2018 - 0 Comments - Be the first, contribute now!

Triumph TR6
Triumph TR6
Triumph TR6
Triumph TR6
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Despite its much maligned fuel injection system, this Triumph super six sports car is easy to maintain and improve at home, costing no more than a TR4 and you couldn’t wish for better back up and support from both the many owners clubs and an army of specialists. General parts availability is excellent, with a wide range of items remanufactured or refurbished. Here’s how to keep your TR6 driving as good as it looks!

Engine

Oil pressure should be quite high. If it drops as low as 10psi at idle or is erratic, the crank is probably worn. Hot running not unknown and a new rad is good investment using Evans Waterless Coolant

Front suspension

Front trunnions need periodic lubrication; ideally it should be EP90 gear oil. Lower suspension wishbone mounting brackets are known to fall off so check regularly. Springs known to sag

Transmission

You need to watch crank pulley movement at front of engine as the clutch is operated – if above 0.015in of play thrust washer can fall out. Oversized washers can cure this in situ

Chassis

If the chassis has had too many patchwork repairs then consider a new frame: uneven door lines are a clue. so is jacking the car up and seeing if their alignment becomes worse (see Top Mod)

Brakes

Don’t forget that the earlier TR4 used disc brakes which are actually larger than the later 5/6 set-ups. The rest of the brakes pose no particular problems apart from routine service work

Wheels & tyres

Wire wheels need regular checks and don’t forget the hubs and splines either. When new, Triumph used to recommend checking and adjusting the front hubs every 12,000 miles

Body & trim

Parts availability is great and are of good quality (try BMH). The hood is a simple affair costing under £250. If cabin ventilation isn’t good then it may be due to the air vent flap not operating correctly

Fuel injection

The fuel injection, which despite its age and – compared to modern set ups – simplicity is still best left to TR experts because its state of tune dictates the car’s overall performance

Chassis

Outriggers rot badly and cost £2000 as the body ideally needs to come off. Front end hides lots of nasties while reinforcing the differential and the trailing arms is wise. Chassis arms give way

Rear end

Axles are sturdy but known to leak; rebuild costs £1000. Infamous Triumph spline lock is cured by installing modified driveshafts, otherwise keep a close eye on originals and their universal joints

Top mod

CTM Engineering of Southampton specialises in repairs or new chassis frames. Remember, a new chassis not only rids you of rust problems but it will be much stiffer and aid rigidity, talking of which, TR Enterprises sells a chassis stiffening kit for just £75 although the company adds that you need to decide how much you want to add before altering suspension settings – a roll cage also adds rigidity although too much spoils a TR’s handling say experts.



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