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Triumph 2000/2500

Triumph 2000/2500 Published: 27th Sep 2019 - 0 Comments - Be the first, contribute now!

Triumph 2000/2500
Triumph 2000/2500
Triumph 2000/2500
Triumph 2000/2500
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Triumph’s 2000 formed the basis of the Stag and, as a result, this saloon shares the same qualities of that stylish coupé/cabrio – but without the well known Stag snags. Or prices… These quality upmarket saloons and estates currently represent excellent value for money plus are supremely easy to maintain at home backed with the level of parts supply you’d expect of a Triumph along with an army of specialists. Best to join the 2000/2500 Register first of all!

Transmission

Tough, but rear layshaft roller bearings can fail. Difficulty selecting first and reverse on a 2500, maybe due to a pattern part clutch fitted. Iffy overdrive usually due to lack of oil or dodgy electrical connections

Engine

Hot running can be an issue causing head gaskets to fail and even the heads to crack; if you have a pre-’68 car that requires one, aim for the better GT6 head. Lucas PI is ok if serviced and set up properly

Bottom end

Can suffer with excess crank ‘endfloat’. Oil pressure should be quite high; if it drops as low as 10psi then the crank or shells are wearing along with the oil pump; all can be done with engine in situ

Front suspension

Tie bars and steering rack need to have bushes inspected regularly. Knocking from column or when on uneven ground is common, usually a top bush cheap to replace, many just live with it…

Chassis

Rot is endemic and May ’74 onwards Mk2s seem to be most rot-prone of all with parts not as prevalent as other Triumphs either. Rear suspension pick-up points need a regular and thorough watch

Body

The front wings are double-skinned around the wheelarches, creating a water trap. The most common problem concerns rotten sills, footwells. Don’t think that Stag panels will fit either

Wheels & brakes

Rear wheel bearings aren’t a DIY proposition to replace so most owners fit an exchange hub; Stag ones are stronger, too. MK1s have thinner discs. BMW servo helps response, Stag wheels fit a treat

Interior

New trim extinct but thanks to the Stag’s popularity, there’s no shortage of interior custom parts for Mk2s. Front seat frames perish, wood cappings suffer from the sunlight, wood splits, costly to refurb

Rear suspension

Lots of bushes to replace if you want a ‘new car’ feel. Sliding driveshaft couplings need an annual lube to avoid back end twitchiness. Watch for that quill shaft as it is known to break up

Stag saloon?

Well, yes and Triumph did although never took it further than development mules, unlike tuner Del Lines who marketed Stag-converted 2.5Pi saloons and estates during the 1970s. It’s not a straight drop in however and the Rover V8 is probably the more sensible fit. With all engine swaps consult a specialist on the optimum spring rates – don’t leave them as standard whatever you do. Too many conversions did and it affects high speed stability and handling dramatically



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