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Mini (Non Cooper Versions)

Published: 16th Jun 2011 - 0 Comments - Be the first, contribute now!
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Mini (Non Cooper Versions)
Mini (Non Cooper Versions)

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Mini specifications changed during production; consult manufacturer’s literature for full details of each aspect of maintenance, specific to your model. This feature concentrates on pre-1980 cars).

(Note - Mileage/time intervals shown are suggested for typical use; frequency may need to be increased under harsh operating conditions. Mini specifications changed during production; consult manufacturer’s literature for full details of each aspect of maintenance, specific to your model. This feature concentrates on pre-1980 cars).

Engine

All Mini units are overhead valve (pushrod), in-line four cylinder BMC A-Series types 848cc 34bhp 998cc 38bhp 1098cc 45bhp 1275cc 54bhp

Valve clearances

Inlet and exhaust, 0.012in. (cold). Adjustment is by conventional screw and locknut. Use ‘Rule of 9’; check/adjust valve No. 1 with No. 8 fully open, No. 2 with 7 open, No. 3 with 6 open, and so on (in each case sum of valve numbers is 9).

Ignition

Firing order: 1-3-4-2 (No. 1 cylinder at thermostat - left hand - end of engine) Spark plugs: Champion N5 (early cars) or N9Y (later examples) or equivalent. Gap 0.025in. Check/clean every 6000 miles or annually (whichever comes first); renew regardless every 12,000 miles. Contact points: Gap 0.014 to 0.016in. corresponding with dwell angle reading of 60 +/- 3 degrees (Lucas 25D4 distributor), or 51 +/- 5 degrees (later examples; Lucas 45D4 distributor with fixed contacts), or 57 +/- 5 degrees (later examples; Lucas 45D4 distributor with sliding contacts), or 57 +/- 2 degrees 30 minutes (Ducellier distributor). In each case, check/clean points every 3000 miles or annually (whichever comes first); renew regardless every 6000 miles. Distributor cap, rotor arm and high tension leads: Every 3000 miles, clean and check condition, ensuring that all connections are sound. Distributor - mechanical aspects: Every 3000 miles, remove rotor arm and apply a few drops of engine oil to moving contact pivot, distributor shaft/cam bearing and mechanical advance mechanism (via holes in distributor’s baseplate). SPARINGLY apply grease to distributor’s cam. Timing: Note - Settings varied according to specific version and age of vehicle. A huge variety of distributor specifications were used; please consult manufacturer’s literature relevant to your car for recommended settings. As examples, the following figures represent a guide for pre-1970 models, and should be regarded as starting points. Note that many Minis have had replacement distributors installed over the years. 848cc, static setting: Lucas DM2 distributor (early cars), 3 degrees before top dead centre (BTDC); refer to timing marks on flywheel. Lucas 25D4 distributor, TDC for manual models; 3 degrees BTDC for automatics (strobe setting, 3 degrees BTDC at 600 rpm for manual versions; 6 degrees BTDC at 600 rpm for automatics). 998cc, static setting: Lucas 25D4 distributor, 5 degrees BTDC for manual models; 4 degrees BTDC for automatics (strobe setting, 7.5 degrees BTDC at 600 rpm for manual versions; 6 degrees BTDC for automatics). 1275GT, static setting: 2 degrees BTDC (strobe setting, 5 degrees BTDC at 600rpm).

Cooling system

At all times, use quality anti-freeze mixture containing corrosion inhibitors. Every 3000 miles/annually, inspect radiator, all hoses, water pump and fan. At least every three years, drain system, remove thermostat and reverse-flush prior to re-filling system with fresh anti-freeze solution (observe dilution recommendations of anti-freeze manufacturer - printed on container). Capacity, including heater: Approx. 6.25 pints (3.55 litres).

Brakes

At least every 3000 miles or annually, whichever comes first, examine front brake pads and discs (where fitted), or front brake shoes, cylinders and drums (remove drums for proper inspection), also rear shoes, cylinders and drums (remove drums for detailed inspection). Check also brake pipes, flexible hoses and master cylinder. Make a point of closely inspecting the fixed brake pipes in the vicinity of the rear sub-frame (partially hidden and can corrode unseen!). Renew any ailing components AT ONCE. AVOID INHALING DUST FROM PADS/SHOES – MAY CONTAIN ASBESTOS. Adjust brake shoe to drum clearance as required (rotate adjusters on backplates), then check handbrake operation a few times and re-adjust cable length if necessary (at handbrake lever trunnion). Ensure handbrake cable quadrants are free to move; free off/re-lubricate as required. At least every two years, change brake fluid.

Fuel system

Every 3000 miles or annually (whichever comes first), examine all fuel system pipework and check/top up carburettor dashpot with SAE 20 oil. Check filter in electric type fuel pumps, where fitted (early cars). Check for fuel/oil leaks from mechanical pumps (1969 on). After valve clearances and all ignition settings have been checked/set, and with engine fully warmed up, alternately re-adjust carburettor mixture/idle speed settings, to achieve smoothest possible tickover. Aim for idling speed of approximately 500 rpm (650 rpm for automatics), for 850/1000 models; 650-750 rpm for 1100/1275GT versions. (Note: If fuel mixture seems excessively rich after all engine/carburettor adjustments have been made, carburettor needle and jet assembly may be worn. In such cases, replacing ailing needle/jet with new items will improve emissions, fuel consumption and driveability). Clean composite type air filter (early models) or renew paper air filter element every 12,000 miles (or sooner if visibly dirty; check every 6000 miles at least). Ensure that breather pipework is clean.


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